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Rwanda Parliament Passes Asylum Bill

by Daniel Sabiiti
9:24 pm

Rwanda Parliament has approved a new proposed bill that will allow the government of Rwanda to take in asylum seekers from the Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland following agreements signed between all parties.

The proposed bill, was tabled by the Minister of Justice and Attorney General, Dr. Emmanuel Ugirashebuja before the Parliament Chamber of Deputies this February 22, 2024,

The proposal witnessed a collective parliamentary assent and consent on its value, importance, and significance, in light of Rwanda’s policies and practices of opening doors to all refugees and asylum seekers found in the country’s history.

Minister Ugirashebuja said that at least 2000 asylum seekers will come to Rwanda in the next four months and tentatively expecting this movement to be done in phases.

Ugirashebuja informed parliament that there is already a task team that is on the ground (in Rwanda) which has been working on details of the transition.

The Minister noted that children under the age of 18, as unaccompanied persons, will not be allowed in the country as agreed on and their migration cases will be treated in their current host countries (Great Britain and N. Ireland).

Minister of Justice and Attorney General, Dr. Emmanuel Ugirashebuja before the Parliament Chamber of Deputies this February 22, 2024,

MPs welcomed the bill and said it is a great move for the country which has a track record of being host and home to various refugees including those in the region from DRC and Burundi, Afghanistan, Libya, Ethiopia, and Eritrea among others.

MPS asked that they should be granted security and protection from gangs and human trafficking groups that may follow them to Rwanda to entice them to fall victim to trafficking.

MPs also asked that the process of reintegration be made smooth to not only host the asylum seekers but also make them feel at home in Rwanda.

Some MPs asked why the asylum seekers don’t stay in those countries and money in agreements is used to take care of them.

Ugirashebuja replied that the country wants to contribute to the process and money comes secondary to the fact of being part of the solution to the issues of asylum seekers.

“We are seeing this as a sustainable solution compared to previous solutions tabled before,” he said.

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